On Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS) or, Does God Make Mistakes? (Part II)

This is the second part of a larger, multi-post entity in which I discuss SRS, God’s intentions, and some of my decisions concerning both.  For context and set-up, please read Part I first!

Scientifically it’s a difference of rarity and perception

If we step aside from morality and God for a moment, the biggest distinction between the birth defect I came into the world with and the ‘defect’ of my body’s gender is one of commonality: roughly 50% of humans are male* but only .14% of the population has the type of birth defect I had.

Have you seen the movie Penelope?  A girl is born into a family with a long-overdue curse that grants her a pig’s snout and ears.  She goes through a lot of trauma, not because pig snouts are inherently disgusting, but because she’s different from the norm.  How would the movie have turned out if pig snouts weren’t so unusual?  What if roughly half of the population had noses like pigs?  You’re right, there’d be no movie – she’s have lived her merry life and we’d all be watching movies about those rare people with a third eye or flower-scented flatulence or something.

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On Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS) or, Does God Make Mistakes? (Part I)

This post turned out to be really long, and I can’t think of a good way to shorten it.  So, I’ve posted it in two parts.  If you read one, read both, as the overarching argument leads directly through the two of them.  Find the next part here.

The million-dollar question: does God make mistakes?

Short answer?  I don’t think He does, but that’s hardly all the story, so read on!

Let’s start by clarifying what Sex Reassignment Surgery (hereafter called SRS) is: it’s the process of surgically altering genitals and other secondary sexual characteristics to more closely resemble another sex.  Treatment can be divided into two parts, plastic surgeries (to change, remove, reshape genitals or other secondary sexual characteristics) and hormone treatments (where androgens and estrogens are blocked or increased in the body to match those of the desired gender, also resulting in physical changes).  As there are varied physical differences between men and women, all of the different ways of treatment are grouped under this label, and knowing that someone has pursued SRS doesn’t contain any detail about what sexual characteristics have been treated or in what manner.

Obviously, there are limitations to this practice and nothing in the actual chromosomal and genetic makeup of the body is changed, just ‘surface’ features.  SRS requires multiple surgeries, is expensive, and is often not covered by medical insurance policies.  Plus, like any surgical procedure, there is a risk of other complications.

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